For a fast dinner, think chard

September 15, 2014

Blanching the chopped stems to give them a head start on cooking.

Blanching the chopped stems to give them a head start on cooking.


In the pan: Cut washed chard leaves into thin ribbons. Saute 1-2 peeled and crushed garlic cloves in olive oil until lightly golden. Add chard, salt and more olive oil if needed. When well wilted and fragrant, remove from heat and garnish with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

In the pan: Cut washed chard leaves into thin ribbons. Saute 1-2 peeled and crushed garlic cloves in olive oil until lightly golden. Add chard, salt and more olive oil if needed. When well wilted and fragrant, remove from heat and garnish with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.


Ready to eat:  Two fat bunches of chard cost about $10 at McCaffrey's on Sept. 14.  A family of four can have generous portions of Swiss chard for two meals - that's about $1.25 a serving.  Chard, a relative to beets, spinach and quinoa, is a superfood - rich in antioxidants and helpful in regulating blood sugar.

Ready to eat: Two fat bunches of chard cost about $10 at McCaffrey’s on Sept. 14. A family of four can have generous portions of Swiss chard for two meals – that’s about $1.25 a serving. Chard, a relative to beets, spinach and quinoa, is a superfood – rich in antioxidants and helpful in regulating blood sugar.